Flexibility Training

Much like other areas of health and fitness, flexibility has a systematic progression based on your goals, needs and capabilities. The three phases of flexibility training that I like to use are corrective, active and functional.


Corrective flexibility is used for increasing joint range of motion, improving muscle imbalances and correcting alter joint mechanics. Some of the techniques for corrective flexibility include foam rolling (also known as self myofascial release) and static stretching. Foam rolling would be used for tight or overactive muscles to help relax and elongate improving muscle extensibility. During static stretching will improve muscle extensibility further by holding your stretches for 20 to 60 seconds allowing for greater lengthening of the muscle.

 

The next phase of flexibility is active flexibility, which uses active-isolated stretching. This allows for the agonist and the synergist muscles to move through a full range of motion while the antagonists are being stretched. In most cases the stretches are only held for 2 to 5 seconds at the end range of motion and then relaxed and it would be done for a specific number of repetitions.

The third phase in the flexibility continuum is functional flexibility which utilizes dynamic stretching. For dynamic stretching you need multiplane are extensibility with optimal neuromuscular control throughout the full range of motion. One easy example of this would be doing bodyweight squats or walking lunges with a medicine ball rotation.

The third phase in the flexibility continuum is functional flexibility which utilizes dynamic stretching. For dynamic stretching you need multiplane are extensibility with optimal neuromuscular control throughout the full range of motion. One easy example of this would be doing bodyweight squats or walking lunges with a medicine ball rotation.

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What Quest Fitness Is All About

The theory behind Quest Fitness is that everyone’s fitness journey is unique. Sure, you may share the same goal as the next person, but how you get there can be very different. Not everyone wants to run miles, lift weights or do push-ups, and not everyone has the self motivation to do at home videos. What we do first, at Quest Fitness, is sit down and talk game plan. We need to be on the same page on how we will get through all the different phases of your workout. Then, we schedule times to meet. Yes, it will take time, but you will have the support that you need through all the struggles. Your Quest for a more fit you starts here.IMG_3641

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Why Not?

Some days I just love pushing those limits! Last night was a great weightless class! I decided to finish it out with something new for myself. This is not something I would suggest for a beginner.


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Core Training 

A lot of people want that flat belly or ripped abs.

But a lot of people tend to over train them. Abs are like any other muscle, and like other muscles they need time to recover.

A personal suggestion would be to train them only 1-3 times a week. If you focus on proper movement through your kinetic chain you only really need to once.

Here are some examples of what I mean by Kinetic Chain Training:

Instead of using a bench for chest press, get out the Stability Ball.

  • Balance your shoulders and neck on the ball
  • push your hips up
  • tighten the core to hold yourself level

Yes you will likely have to go with decrease the weight load but you will get more core engagement. To compensate for the decrease in weight, slow the tempo.

Now for the legs.

First, get off the machines, and yes you can do squats. Squats take a lot of core engagement!

  • At the top of your squat tighten up that core by pulling the belly button into the spine.
  • Then lower yourself down with back straight and weight in the heels.

Things like this can be added into any routine to aid in building the abs. It’s not all about crunches and planks. Your abs can be worked by properly moving. Also don’t forget the cardio and proper diet. I suggest meeting with a trainer to learn proper movements to build that core. If you still want to challenge that core, then checkout the link to my latest ab routine.

 

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Want to see how I’ve progress? My Fitness Journey.

New Challenges 

2/16/16 I took on a challenge to test my core stability. I attempted a head stand to a front elbow lever.


My elbow lever wasn’t perfect and needs work, but the important thing is that I tried.

I strongly believe you should constantly challenging yourself.

Without the challenge how can you grow? I extend the challenge to you to try something new, and test your limits. You may not succeed your first try, but don’t give up.

Learn from your personal fitness failures, and move forward towards a healthier you.

A true master had failed more than a beginner has tried.

 

Have Questions? Contact Me.

Want to see how I’ve progress? My Fitness Journey.

Importance of Core Training 

Ray Shonk, Body Exercise, Quest Fitness Gym, Kent County Michigan
I am healthier in my late 30’s than early 20’s.

Core training has become a growing fitness trend in recent years and used by personal trainers as a common method of training. the objective is to uniformly strengthen the superficial and deep muscles that stabilize, move and align the trunk of the body.  These exercises especially the back and the abdominal muscles.

Historically, physical therapists would work a client’s core muscles to help with lower back issues.

More recently has grown popular with athletes to aid in sport performance. Core programs are regularly built for training clients with goals ranging from flatter mid sections to needing a stronger lower back.
A weak core leads to a fundamental problem inherent to ineffective movements that tend to lead to injury. designing a proper core program helps gain neuromuscular control, strength, muscular endurance, stability and power.
Regardless of age, or physical level, core training should be introduced into your regular training routine.

If unsure where to start, contact a fitness professional to show you the best and safest ways to train your core.